October 26 Panel Discussion on Climate Change – LIU Post

Climate Change Conference Flyer 8.5x11

Oct 26 Climate Event LIU Post

LIU Post Lacrosse Teams Clean Up Local Beach in Bayville

Bayville, N.Y. – This past weekend, the LIU Post men’s and women’s lacrosse teams capped off the summer by lending a hand in cleaning up Centre Island Beach in Bayville.

The 12 student-athletes spent two-and-a-half hours picking up trash and tossing the garbage bags into containers.

“Cleaning up the beaches in Bayville helped our teammates learn about environmental sustainability,” said Pioneers’ women’s lacrosse senior defender/midfielder Kaitlin Gaghan (North Massapequa, N.Y.). “We loved having the opportunity to help the community and stay involved.”MLAX_WLAX

originally posted: http://www.eccsports.org/sports/wlax/2015-16/releases/092115_liupcleanup

Fall 2015 Meeting Schedule

(We meet Common Hour – 12:45 to 1:45 pm)
Monday September 21    – HILLWOOD 106
Tuesday October 13   – HILLWOOD 114
Wednesday November 4  – HILLWOOD 106
Thursday December 3   – HONORS LOUNGE

LIU Provides New Transportation Service

By Jeniel Terrero
Staff Writer

Since it’s primarily a commuter campus, many LIU Post students drive their own vehicles. For those who don’t have access to a car, if they need to travel outside campus perimeters, the only options they have had in the past are taxis, the off-campus shuttle, or the N-20 MTA bus. These options often come with complications, usually concerning time and money. However, the university has expanded their transportation options with the Rideshare Portal.

Photo by Tia Mona Greene Photo by Tia Mona Greene

The Ride Share Portal is a service LIU Post began offering on Monday, April 13, in partnership with 511NY Rideshare, a ride matching service for travelers and commuters. LIU Post students, faculty, and staff can register and create a profile online where they can find people to carpool with. The purpose of this service is to have individuals use an accessible service that finds other commuters who have…

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Chasing Ice – The Most Captivating Documentary I've Ever Seen

By: Kristen Linsalata, News Editor, The Pioneer
“Chasing Ice” directed by Jeff Orlowski is the most captivating documentary about the planet’s rapidly melting glaciers that I have ever seen. The reoccurring images of the receding glaciers from all over the world caused me to think: If glaciers are representative of climate change, then how long will it be before it is too late to save them? How long will it be until we can no longer reverse the damage that we have done to the world? The documentary resoundingly conveys that the answer is now. We have already done irrevocable damage. If we continue on abusing the world and nature in the way we do, then it will be too late for our children, our grandchildren, and our great grandchildren.

Chasing Ice

One of the most captivating scenes of the documentary was the live footage of the calving of a glacier in Greenland – the longest calving event to ever be caught on film. As I watched the glacier dying slowly at first, then rapidly, I realized the same is true for the rest of our Earth. Because of our abuse, the Earth has been dying a slow death, but now over the last ten years, the effects of climate change and greenhouse gases have been astronomically more evident than it ever has in history.

The part that I enjoyed most was how the documentary addressed the naysayers of global warming. There are certain individuals who claim that climate change is a “myth” and the documentary even showed someone saying that climate change is one of the biggest hoaxes on the American people ever. One of their main arguments against the presence of climate change, according to the documentary, is that some glaciers grow, which wouldn’t be a response to a global warming signal. However, the documentary presented a study where glaciers were studied in the Yukon Territory in Canada from 1958 to 2008, and out of the 1,400 glaciers that were there in 1958, only four grew, over 400 disappeared, and almost all of the remaining glaciers got smaller. These facts are sobering but undeniable when considering the presence of global warming and its effects on our planet.

In “Chasing Ice,” James Balog and his team’s dedication to bringing awareness to this issue is evident. When Balog cried, you wanted to cry with him. This cause obviously means so much to him. But why doesn’t it mean more to our peers? We must remind ourselves that as our planet dies, we die along with it. Balog says in the documentary that we are connected to nature in more ways than we can even conceive and I unequivocally agree. Thank you to LIU Post Sustainability for showing this film and bringing awareness to this very important issue.

Check out the trailer to Chasing Ice below:

To request a future screening of Chasing Ice at LIU Post, please email William.Achnitz@liu.edu.

Chasing Ice – The Most Captivating Documentary I’ve Ever Seen

By: Kristen Linsalata, News Editor, The Pioneer
“Chasing Ice” directed by Jeff Orlowski is the most captivating documentary about the planet’s rapidly melting glaciers that I have ever seen. The reoccurring images of the receding glaciers from all over the world caused me to think: If glaciers are representative of climate change, then how long will it be before it is too late to save them? How long will it be until we can no longer reverse the damage that we have done to the world? The documentary resoundingly conveys that the answer is now. We have already done irrevocable damage. If we continue on abusing the world and nature in the way we do, then it will be too late for our children, our grandchildren, and our great grandchildren.

Chasing Ice

One of the most captivating scenes of the documentary was the live footage of the calving of a glacier in Greenland – the longest calving event to ever be caught on film. As I watched the glacier dying slowly at first, then rapidly, I realized the same is true for the rest of our Earth. Because of our abuse, the Earth has been dying a slow death, but now over the last ten years, the effects of climate change and greenhouse gases have been astronomically more evident than it ever has in history.

The part that I enjoyed most was how the documentary addressed the naysayers of global warming. There are certain individuals who claim that climate change is a “myth” and the documentary even showed someone saying that climate change is one of the biggest hoaxes on the American people ever. One of their main arguments against the presence of climate change, according to the documentary, is that some glaciers grow, which wouldn’t be a response to a global warming signal. However, the documentary presented a study where glaciers were studied in the Yukon Territory in Canada from 1958 to 2008, and out of the 1,400 glaciers that were there in 1958, only four grew, over 400 disappeared, and almost all of the remaining glaciers got smaller. These facts are sobering but undeniable when considering the presence of global warming and its effects on our planet.

In “Chasing Ice,” James Balog and his team’s dedication to bringing awareness to this issue is evident. When Balog cried, you wanted to cry with him. This cause obviously means so much to him. But why doesn’t it mean more to our peers? We must remind ourselves that as our planet dies, we die along with it. Balog says in the documentary that we are connected to nature in more ways than we can even conceive and I unequivocally agree. Thank you to LIU Post Sustainability for showing this film and bringing awareness to this very important issue.

Check out the trailer to Chasing Ice below:

To request a future screening of Chasing Ice at LIU Post, please email William.Achnitz@liu.edu.

Solar & Offshore Wind: Can Renewable Energy Work For Long Island?

By: Bessie Weisman, Sustainability Coordinator, LIU Post

solar and wind

On Monday, April 13th, LIU Post welcomed three renewable energy professionals to present about themselves and their field of work. Following the presentations was a Q&A panel discussion where students and community members got a chance to pick the brains of these renewable energy experts.

The first presentation was given by Stephanie McClellan, the Director of the Special Initiative on Offshore Wind (SIOW) at the University of Delaware. Her location of focus is Delaware, but she easily tied in her knowledge of wind power to the region as a whole. McClellen touted offshore wind as having the greatest renewable and carbon-reducing energy source for the entire East Coast. She used Europe as an example of a region in which offshore wind is being successfully utilized and she is hoping to capitalize on the methods of such accomplishments through her position with SIOW.

offshore-wind-turbines

The second presenter was Clinton L. Plummer, Vice President of Development for Deepwater Wind. Plummer eloquently spoke of the projects that Deepwater Wind has been developing, and, most notably, he discussed the company’s wind farm to be located on Block Island. The Block Island Wind Farm will be 30-megawatts, situated approximately three miles southeast of Block Island, and it will have 5 wind turbines in total. Below is a visual of where the project will be located. The power source, as Plummer highlighted, will generate enough energy to provide for 17,000 homes. This project, he thinks, will be especially useful in sparking the public’s interest and trust in the potential of offshore wind. Considering the turbines will be far enough away not to block anyone’s view to the beach, but close enough that people could take a quick boat ride to see them, the project will stand as a solid means to establish offshore wind as a valued form of power to the public.

Deepwater ONE map

Finally, Carlo Lanza finished off the series of presentations with his discussion of solar power. Lanza wears many hats, between being the founding member and leader of Harvest Power LLC, to his role as chairman for the Long Island Solar Energy Industries Association (LISEIA) and his efforts in working with PSEG Long Island and policymakers, he is deeply involved in all aspects of his field. Lanza said that he was initially inspired to delve into the discipline of solar energy after he heard the astounding fact that, in one hour, the sun bathes the Earth in more energy than what is used worldwide in a typical year. After hearing this, Lanza became an engineer and later took on a myriad of roles in acting toward promoting solar energy installations and use.

Overall, these renewables professionals gave hope to the students enrolled in the Environmental Sustainability programs at LIU Post, like myself, in the sense that we were reassured of the many diverse employment opportunities in our anticipated field. The panel members also expressed the importance of understanding the relatively novel nature of sustainability and renewable energy. In their experience, they all came from multidimensional educational backgrounds and work hard at the many roles they play to make strides in offshore wind and solar energy. Fundamentally, what unified all of these multifaceted individuals was their enduring passion for their chosen fields that has fostered the success that they each see today.

Solar & Offshore Wind: Can Renewable Energy Work For Long Island?

By: Bessie Weisman, Sustainability Coordinator, LIU Post

solar and wind

On Monday, April 13th, LIU Post welcomed three renewable energy professionals to present about themselves and their field of work. Following the presentations was a Q&A panel discussion where students and community members got a chance to pick the brains of these renewable energy experts.

The first presentation was given by Stephanie McClellan, the Director of the Special Initiative on Offshore Wind (SIOW) at the University of Delaware. Her location of focus is Delaware, but she easily tied in her knowledge of wind power to the region as a whole. McClellen touted offshore wind as having the greatest renewable and carbon-reducing energy source for the entire East Coast. She used Europe as an example of a region in which offshore wind is being successfully utilized and she is hoping to capitalize on the methods of such accomplishments through her position with SIOW.

offshore-wind-turbines

The second presenter was Clinton L. Plummer, Vice President of Development for Deepwater Wind. Plummer eloquently spoke of the projects that Deepwater Wind has been developing, and, most notably, he discussed the company’s wind farm to be located on Block Island. The Block Island Wind Farm will be 30-megawatts, situated approximately three miles southeast of Block Island, and it will have 5 wind turbines in total. Below is a visual of where the project will be located. The power source, as Plummer highlighted, will generate enough energy to provide for 17,000 homes. This project, he thinks, will be especially useful in sparking the public’s interest and trust in the potential of offshore wind. Considering the turbines will be far enough away not to block anyone’s view to the beach, but close enough that people could take a quick boat ride to see them, the project will stand as a solid means to establish offshore wind as a valued form of power to the public.

Deepwater ONE map

Finally, Carlo Lanza finished off the series of presentations with his discussion of solar power. Lanza wears many hats, between being the founding member and leader of Harvest Power LLC, to his role as chairman for the Long Island Solar Energy Industries Association (LISEIA) and his efforts in working with PSEG Long Island and policymakers, he is deeply involved in all aspects of his field. Lanza said that he was initially inspired to delve into the discipline of solar energy after he heard the astounding fact that, in one hour, the sun bathes the Earth in more energy than what is used worldwide in a typical year. After hearing this, Lanza became an engineer and later took on a myriad of roles in acting toward promoting solar energy installations and use.

Overall, these renewables professionals gave hope to the students enrolled in the Environmental Sustainability programs at LIU Post, like myself, in the sense that we were reassured of the many diverse employment opportunities in our anticipated field. The panel members also expressed the importance of understanding the relatively novel nature of sustainability and renewable energy. In their experience, they all came from multidimensional educational backgrounds and work hard at the many roles they play to make strides in offshore wind and solar energy. Fundamentally, what unified all of these multifaceted individuals was their enduring passion for their chosen fields that has fostered the success that they each see today.

LIU Partners With 511NY For Rideshare Program

CAMPUS PRESS RELEASE

earthdayIn celebration of Earth Day, April 22, LIU announced a new partnership with New York State’s 511NY Rideshare network, a telephone, online, and mobile app resource that helps commuters and employers find easy and affordable alternatives to driving alone while also reducing environmental impact.

With 511NY Rideshare, LIU employees will be able to find free and convenient car-share, transit, and van-pool information. The service is open to all employees and can be accessed via MyLIU. The portal is secure and will offer users the option of searching for ridematches with other LIU employees at your campus.

In addition to ridematching, 511NY Rideshare also offers information on alternative transportation options that will save time and money, as well as access to New York State’s 511NY network for real-time travel, transit and traffic updates. Visit my.liu.edu and click “LIU Rideshare” to get started on going green today.

Posted 04/13/2015

College 101 Class Promotes Sustainability 

By Danielle Sposato
Staff Writer

Professor Sassenoff’s College 101 students plant a tree outside of Suffolk Hall. Photo: Tia Mona Greene Professor Sassenoff’s College 101 students plant a tree outside of Suffolk Hall.
Photo: Tia Mona Greene

Professor Lauren Sassenoff’s College 101 class during the fall of 2014 created a service learning project called “Purify Your Mind” to promote sustainability on campus. The “Purify Your Mind” motto created by the class has now grown on campus, and is being used to promote sustainability among students.

The service learning projects can be ways to improve campus life, or to improve life outside of campus, like the environment. Students must find a theme for their service learning project to create a concrete plan for what they desire to accomplish.

The campus Sustainability Committee is trying to incorporate ways that freshman can promote going green through their College 101 classes, according to Sassenoff, a Professor of English. “Our College 101 class carried [out] an original idea that will hopefully pave…

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