Category Archives: Recycling

Bottle Recycling at LIU Post

In June 2012, the LIU Post Recycling Program received 40 new recycling bins from the Coca-Cola/Keep America Beautiful Recycling Bin Grant Program. The Coca-Cola/KAB Recycling Bin Grant Program supports recycling in communities and on college and university campuses by providing bins to selected grant recipients for the collection of beverage container recyclables. Grants are provided to a limited number of applicants who can demonstrate how their proposals will lead to sustainable recycling opportunities.

The new bins are in the shape of a water bottle and will help increase the visibility of the LIU Post Recycling Program.

Bottle BinHere is where you can find Dasani Bottle Bins::

• Hillwood – East/West Café
• Hillwood – Fishbowl
• Hillwood – 2nd Floor Lounge
• Bookmark Café in the Library
• The POD dining area in Pell Hall
• Kahn Hall Lobby
• Pratt Concession Stand
• Phys. Ed Department (Back of Pratt
• Lorber Hall – 2nd Floor Lounge
• Fine Arts Building
• Honors Office Lounge
• WCWP Radio Station

Other bins were placed in various offices/departments that generate lots of beverage containers. Some of these bins will remain in storage for recycling at large events on campus. Student clubs and organizations may request these bins for their events when they submit a program request to the Department of Student Life and Leadership Development.

For more information about the Coca Cola/KAB Recycling Bin Grant Program, you may visit http://bingrant.org/

Terra Blight: Do You Know Where Your Old Electronics Go?

By: Melissa Colleary, Senior Sustainability Coordinator, LIU Post

We all use electronics. We text, use laptops, social media, play games, and work on our electronic devices. Even kids have them now, and they oftentimes know how to use them better than adults. In a country where we are so dependent on these devices, a lot of attention has been paid to developing new technology to replace what quickly becomes obsolete. A new iPhone will come out and people will flock to stores to get their hands on one the day it comes out, sometimes even resorting to violence while waiting in line.

With so much attention being paid to “keeping up with the Joneses,” it’s easy to forget that our old devices have to go somewhere when we’re done with them. The documentary Terra Blight addresses just that: where our devices go when we are no longer using them. The film transitions between the United States, a country known for its consumer culture, and Ghana, a third world country in Africa. The scenes in the United States show how Americans feel about electronics, particularly highlighting the gaming industry by showing people who participate in LAN parties and who spend thousands of dollars updating their technology. When asked about where the old devices go, none of the people interviewed seemed to know or even care for that matter.

Terra Blight

The film then transitioned to Ghana, where a lot of the e-waste from the United States goes to die. The country is extremely impoverished and underdeveloped, and land that used to be grasslands and marshes have been turned into dumping grounds for electronics. These dumping grounds are a source of both profit and pain for the people of Ghana. Young children are shown picking through broken computers in search of metals to sell for money to go to school, and shop keepers sell obsolete computer hardware to people who aren’t even sure what a computer does. The health impacts are made extremely apparent throughout these scenes. There are several references to the horrendous smell, and children are shown with cuts on their hands and feet.

Perhaps the most shocking part of the film was the fact that some of the e-waste that is dumped in Ghana is from the United States government and even from the United States EPA. In a country that claims to be the best in the world, it seems hypocritical to claim a type of responsibility that clearly is not there. It seems as though the US government has taken a policy of “out of sight, out of mind” with no mind for the consequences. The US has labor laws protecting its children, meanwhile, they are shipping their e-waste off to a country where children are so poor that they are forced to pick through harmful materials in hopes of earning enough money to get an education.

Terra Blight Scene

A scene from the movie Terra Blight

A conference hosted by the EPA was also depicted in the film; however, the journalist was not allowed to enter the meeting as he was with a “private” film crew. The woman at the door to the event was not only dismissive, but she was confrontational in telling him how much she would enjoy getting security to make him leave. At this scene in the film, it made me wonder what exactly they were hiding. Later, on a trip to the dump site, people from the conference were taking pictures of the rubbish and of the children. To me, it was disgusting to watch people taking pictures with children holding garbage, almost as though it was a tourist attraction rather than an environmental crisis.

Terra Blight is such an important film because it provides so much information about a very real problem in the world. While people are concerned about the speed of their internet or the size of their iPhone, children are picking through the remains of what we no longer use in Africa. The good news, however, is that there is a lot that we can do to stop this from continuing. Probably the easiest way is to just recycle your electronics when you’re done with them, and make sure you recycle them through a reputable organization that does not dump them in third world countries. The Department of Facilities Services at LIU Post, for example, offers such a program to the campus community by utilizing Regional Computer Recycling & Recovery, a certified vendor that adheres to responsible disposal methods.

Truck

If you’re not a part of the campus community, you may check with your town government to see what kinds of programs they offer. Many, for example, offer a program called Stop Throwing Out Pollutants, whereby residents can drop off certain types of items including old electronics. Another really awesome option is to donate your old e-waste to a nonprofit organization. Rainforest Connection, for example, uses recycled cell phones to detect the sound of illegal loggers in the rainforest. With so many options, please keep the end in mind; responsibly recycle your old electronic devices.

Check out the trailer to Terra Blight:

Tell Us About Your Good, “Green” Deeds

By: Melissa Colleary, Senior Sustainability Coordinator, LIU Post

This semester, LIU Post is participating in the RecycleMania 3R Actions Challenge. The challenge, which is 8 weeks long, consists of 4 categories where students can gain points for their college by sharing their “green” actions on social media. The 4 categories, each spanning a two-week period, ask students to focus on a theme for that particular stage of the competition.

RM 3R Actions logo

The themes for each stage are:

Stage 1: Recycling (February 1 to 14): Actions focused on recycling (paper, bottles, cans, etc.)

Stage 2: Reuse (February 15 to 28): Actions focused on reusing items such as travel mugs, reusable water bottles, shopping at thrift stores, etc.

Stage 3: Reduce (March 1 to 14): Actions focused on waste prevention such as double sided printing

Stage 4: Zero Waste (March 15 to 28): Actions that include all of the above

Regardless of the stage, each student can also post pictures showing their school spirit to gain points with the #spirit.

Students can collect points by texting their actions to 21212 with the hashtag #RM2015 and #LIUPost, tweeting their actions to @recyclemaniacs with the hashtag #LIUPost, or downloading the myActions mobile App, and each action requires the use of the keyword that relates to the topic. For example, during the recycling stage, use the term, “recycle”. Every action is also encouraged to include a selfie in addition to the other criteria.

For more information, click HERE.

Tell Us About Your Good, "Green" Deeds

By: Melissa Colleary, Senior Sustainability Coordinator, LIU Post

This semester, LIU Post is participating in the RecycleMania 3R Actions Challenge. The challenge, which is 8 weeks long, consists of 4 categories where students can gain points for their college by sharing their “green” actions on social media. The 4 categories, each spanning a two-week period, ask students to focus on a theme for that particular stage of the competition.

RM 3R Actions logo

The themes for each stage are:

Stage 1: Recycling (February 1 to 14): Actions focused on recycling (paper, bottles, cans, etc.)

Stage 2: Reuse (February 15 to 28): Actions focused on reusing items such as travel mugs, reusable water bottles, shopping at thrift stores, etc.

Stage 3: Reduce (March 1 to 14): Actions focused on waste prevention such as double sided printing

Stage 4: Zero Waste (March 15 to 28): Actions that include all of the above

Regardless of the stage, each student can also post pictures showing their school spirit to gain points with the #spirit.

Students can collect points by texting their actions to 21212 with the hashtag #RM2015 and #LIUPost, tweeting their actions to @recyclemaniacs with the hashtag #LIUPost, or downloading the myActions mobile App, and each action requires the use of the keyword that relates to the topic. For example, during the recycling stage, use the term, “recycle”. Every action is also encouraged to include a selfie in addition to the other criteria.

For more information, click HERE.

LIU Post Celebrates Campus Sustainability Day

By: William Achnitz III, Campus Life Coordinator, LIU Post

October 22nd was Campus Sustainability Day, a day established in 2003 to reflect on the success of the sustainability movement in higher education. Sponsored by Second Nature and a number of other organizations, the theme of this year’s Campus Sustainability Day was “Empowering Change on Campus and in the Community.”

CSD2014Colleges and universities from across the country were invited to participate in Campus Sustainability Day by hosting their own events recognizing the successes, challenges, and innovations of sustainability on their campus. A video hosted by Second Nature, which featured many leaders in higher education, was also produced for schools to share with their campus communities.

LIU Post used Campus Sustainability Day as an opportunity to promote two of its newly established sustainability initiatives – Zipcar and I Love New York Water. In fact, both initiatives launched that day and students from the Student Government Association and the Sustainability Committee helped spread the news by distributing sustainable swag, including Zipcar pens, I Love New York Water stickers, and free reusable water bottles.

PostZipCarZipcar, a car sharing service, is a sustainable alternative to traditional car ownership. In fact, every Zipcar takes 10-15 personally owned vehicles off the road. Members also pay only for the time that they use the vehicle and have no responsibility for additional costs associated with car ownership, such as gas, insurance, parking, registration and maintenance.

It’s literally “Wheels When You Want Them,” hence why that’s their slogan.

If you’re interested in reserving one of the Zipcars on campus, you can do so online by visiting here.

I Love NY Water is a campaign promoting the benefits of New York’s #1 resource: our tap water. Their goal is to promote the use of reusable water bottles and raise awareness about the real costs associated with disposable bottled water. “Refills, not Landfills” as their motto suggests. In addition to receiving a free reusable water bottle with an I Love NY Water sticker already on it, students were encouraged to take a picture of them using the bottle and post it to social media using the hashtag #ILoveNYWater.

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To request your own I Love New York Water sticker, fill out the online form here.

I hope you will join me in going green at LIU Post and take part in the much larger campus sustainability movement!

Getting to The Red Carpet: My Journey With Blue Wrap

By: Joanna Del Giudice, Owner, Uniquely Dipherent by Joanna Stella,      LIU Post Alum (BFA, 2011, MA, 2013)

I am an artist, teacher, and entrepreneur. During my free time, I am determined to save the world with my art, one stitch at a time.

One day, as I was browsing the web for different art opportunities, I stumbled across “Project Blue Wrap,” a name that reminded me of the popular TV show Project Runway, which, incidentally, many people had encouraged me to be a part of. However, the time restraints set forth in each competition wouldn’t have worked for me as it takes me over 100 hours to complete one full ensemble with the crochet technique that I use.

Intrigued by the name, I decided to check it out and discovered that it was indeed a competition that I could enter. The competition entailed using hospital blue wrap to make a dress and the chosen finalists would have their dresses featured on the runway at DC Fashion Week in Washington, DC. According to Inova, the hospital system that sponsors Project Blue Wrap, “blue wrap is a recyclable plastic fabric that is used to maintain the sterility of its contents – most often, surgical instruments and kits. None of the blue wrap used for Project Blue Wrap has ever been in contact with any patients and would otherwise be recycled.”

Immediately after researching this new opportunity, I reached out to a friend who works at John T. Mather Memorial Hospital to see if she could inquire about having them sponsor me, in addition to providing me with recycled blue wrap. Mather Hospital agreed and I acquired about 6 sheets. This proved to be easy; the hardest part was yet to come.

For me, the most difficult part for this competition was coming up with a design concept. In each of my works, I always like to have meaning, so ultimately, I decided to be inspired by the Forget-Me-Not flowers. I chose them because they were my college roommate’s favorite flower and her father had recently passed away, so I wanted to make a dress inspired by her.

I cut up the blue wrap into thin strips (that way it would act as yarn) and I began crocheting…

As the deadline approached, I literally utilized all of my free time. In fact, I began making parts of the dress in public, like a performance artist. For instance, I cut up one of the sheets of blue wrap while on the train to NYC for a concert. I also crocheted some flowers while I was sitting in line waiting for the concert to start.

In order to be considered as a finalist, there also were certain size requirements. This was to ensure that if a model were to wear it on the runway, it would fit regardless of what size she was. I began to search for females in my area who would fit those size requirements that way I could have the dress fitted properly. After all that work, I did not want to chance having my dress being disqualified over a size requirement. I had late night fittings and early morning fittings to work around everyone’s schedule. I was going to do whatever it took to make this dress “runway-ready.”

When it came time to finally mail it, I was both nervous and excited. I had never mailed one of my recycled crocheted dresses before and it had to go a fairly far distance. I had to mail it to Washington D.C. and the dress would have to be physically looked at and tried on. After mailing it, I emailed the woman in charge of Project Blue Wrap to let her know that my dress was on its way. She emailed me back to let me know that she had received it and that everyone in the office loved it. In fact, she said people were stopping by just to get a look at it. What a great feeling that this statement gave me!

However, there was another week to go before the finalists would be officially announced. My mother reassured me that I had to have been one of the winners after receiving such a lovely email. Turns out, the day before my 24th birthday, I received an email congratulating me that my dress would be featured in the kick-off event at DC Fashion Week in Washington, D.C.

The email also stated that I was the recipient of two tickets to the runway event for the kick-off of DC Fashion Week and that I would have two spots reserved for a guest and myself. I immediately called my friend from Mather Hospital and I made the trip to Washington D.C. with her because if it wasn’t for her help, then I would never gotten the blue wrap needed to make my dress.

Project Blue Wrap was such an amazing experience. I ended up sitting in the front row and I watched my dress be the first one to make its way down the runway at DC Fashion Week.

The most valuable thing I learned from this experience was that I do have the potential to get somewhere with my art.

The ultimate goal I have for my art is to one day make it to the red carpet. I want my art to be front and center, as the red carpet signifies a much larger audience. Eventually, I want that larger audience to view my art and learn about the importance of recycling and protecting the environment. Having someone from the entertainment world wearing a dress of mine and having it photographed would definitely make a statement.

I want to make that statement with my art.

blue-wrap

 

Win a Scholarship for Your Sustainable Efforts

The LIU Post Recycling Program, in conjunction with Sustainable Post, opened this year’s Sustainable Creative Expressions Award competition today. The winner of the contest will receive an LIU scholarship for an amount of up to $1,000. (Award amount varies dependent on available amount of funds.) Since 2010, the LIU Post Recycling Program has funded this scholarship with proceeds from the five-cent deposits for recycled bottles and cans on campus.

All LIU Post Students (graduate, undergraduate, full-time, or part-time) are eligible to participate by submitting an original creative work based on the theme for this year’s contest “Be the Change. Make a Difference.” Using the theme, students are asked to create a piece of work that reflects how they have changed the world and how they are making a difference, whether their work relates to LIU Post or the world at large. Works may include written word (essay, poem, short story, etc.), visual art (painting, drawing, photograph, dance, mixed media, graphic design, collage, etc.), or audio visual (composition, video, animation, etc.), but are not limited to those options.

All submissions must be turned into the Office of Student Life and Leadership Development at Hillwood Commons, room 102, no later than April 18, at 4 p.m. For additional information, contact William Achnitz, sustainability coordinator at LIU Post at 516-299-2623 or william.achnitz@liu.edu.

Scholarship-Winner

Last year’s winner, Nancy Wong

Press release via LIU Post

Residence Life Recycles 381 Pounds of Material

From February 24th to March 2nd, the Office of Residence Life held their own version of RecycleMania as part of the annual Cereal Bowl Competition. Which residence hall could collect the most recyclables?

During that week, residents, RAs and RHDs from each residence hall collected paper, cardboard, bottles, and cans in hopes of becoming the victor of RecycleMania. At the end of the week, members of the LIU Post Recycling Program weighed all of the materials and in total, the 6 buildings collectively recycled 381 pounds of recyclable material.

The competition was judged on a per capita basis rather than a total amount collected that way it would place every building, both big and small, on an even playing field. So, with a weight of .977 pounds per resident, Nassau Hall claimed their first RecycleMania victory, recycling 83.5 pounds of material in total.

“As a whole, we encourage our building to recycle as much as possible,” said Arianna Livreri, Residence Hall Director of Nassau Hall.

“Not only did RecycleMania provide us with a great opportunity to educate our residents about recycling and the benefits of being sustainable, but the competition also got residents more aware of their environmental impacts. Now, recycling has become a trend in our building.”

And certainly it has become a trend all across campus.

LIU Post is now recycling more than ever and it all stems from the hard work and efforts displayed by people the likes of the residents of Nassau Hall.

Nassau Hall

Residence Life Staff of Nassau Hall

LIU Post Begins Diverting Air Filters From Landfills

Thanks to the technology developed and patented by Delta M Incorporated, LIU Post will pilot a new Air Filter recycling program in Mullarkey Hall and Winnick House.

7acd47d0a811ee75a58e22bef143ddc2The pilot program, which features the world’s first and only line of completely reusable and recyclable commercial air filters, will reduce costs, improve indoor air quality, and result in 100% waste diversion from HVAC operations. In fact, Delta M estimates that LIU Post can expect to see a minimum cost savings of 40% based on the cost of current filter usage in Mullarkey Hall and Winnick House.

So, how does it work? Well, the process is actually very simple.

First, Delta M delivers the ordered filters to LIU Post. Then, staff from the Department of Facilities Services installs the new purECOgreen filters just like they would with any other filters. And then when the filters reach the end of their service life, they are sent back to Delta M’s refurbishment site, free of charge, where each filter will be returned to a pristine pre-use state. Not to mention, LIU Post will receive a rebate for each undamaged filter that is sent back to Delta M, thus lowering the cost of the filters even more.

With this new partnership, LIU Post is supporting one of the most innovative and sustainable companies in the world, a company most recently recognized by Earth Charter US with a Sustainable Business Award for Innovation.

EA-Award-171kb2

Delta M doesn’t just manufacture a sustainable product; sustainability is at the core of their company. For instance, Delta M Inc. manufactures all of their products in North America using locally-sourced raw materials. They also internally re-use as much as possible from turning castoff filter media into packaging to filtering and reusing their wastewater. Their products are also much more efficient as they last 25 to 30% longer than conventional cardboard filters.

Delta M is committed to helping their customers become more sustainable and LIU Post is excited to begin this new partnership.

RecycleMania Is Upon Us!

RecycleMania yet again descends upon the LIU Post campus.

For the 3rd year in a row now, LIU Post will be competing in the largest recycling competition in North America, the RecycleMania Tournament.

RM_logo_2014

Born in 2001, RecycleMania was the end result of two recycling coordinators from Ohio University and Miami University challenging each other to see which one of their schools could recycle the most. The two schools leveraged their existing sports rivalry and decided to apply it to recycling. Ever since, the amount of schools participating in RecycleMania has increased and now there are 461 colleges and universities competing in the 2014 RecycleMania Tournament spanning all 50 states and 4 Canadian provinces.

RM growth

Growth of the RecycleMania Tournament

LIU Post is looking to improve upon last year’s standings and we hope that you will join in the effort of making that happen by minimizing your waste and recycling as much as you can.

The Tournament runs through the end of March. So, make sure you do everything you can to help LIU Post win!

Also, check back often for RecycleMania updates!!!