Monthly Archives: November 2013

Sustainability At LIU Post: A Year In Review

LIU Post has done a lot in the last year to become more sustainable!

Please take a look at our newly released 2012-2013 Sustainability Report which reviews all of the sustainability initiatives implemented last academic year.

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Go Green, Achieve Gold!

 

Do You Know Where Your Stuff Comes From?

By: William Achnitz III, Sustainability Coordinator, LIU Post

More often than not, I hear people say no. They have no idea where their belongings come from. They have no idea how it was made. And they have no idea what kind of consequences come along with their purchase.

For some time, I was also one of those people. And now being educated on the subject, I feel like it is very important for everyone to take some time to learn about their stuff as it directly impacts both the planet and the people who call this planet home.

The Story of Stuff Project, founded by activist Annie Leonard and her friends from Free Range Studios in December 2007, started as a 20-minute movie detailing the social and environmental consequences that come along with our “Take, Make, Dispose” economy. It also discusses the many issues that this system has created and it calls for us to create a society that is based on better not more.

A society that is centered on sharing not selfishness…community not division.

Please enjoy The Story of Stuff:

Do You Have The Next Big Green Idea?

GreatGreenFlyer_FINAL1-page-001

From The Desk of A Green Office – Continuing Education & The Hutton House Lectures

Officially launching in the spring of 2013, the LIU Post Green Office Program has grown to include 15 offices.

In this new series “From The Desk of A Green Office,” we will be highlighting some of the measures taken by these offices in order to become more sustainable.

This week, we will look at the School of Continuing Education and the Hutton House Lectures.

One of our most recent participants, this office has already made strides in becoming a more sustainable workplace. For example, they have already taken measures to reduce the amount of paper that is printed in their office.

Kay Sato, the Assistant Provost for Continuing Education and Hutton House Lectures, said:

“When we realized that reams of paper were disappearing at an alarming rate, we knew that something had to be done. We then thought of the Green Office Program, which encourages all participating offices to use e-documents whenever possible. And being that we have found that e-documents are becoming more and more accepted we have committed to using them as much as possible rather than printing. Using e-documents whenever possible is certainly the right thing to do for people who really care about the planet!”

In addition to their commitment to use less paper, they are also implementing more sustainable purchasing decisions. For example, instead of serving coffee in Styrofoam cups which are not recyclable, the School of Continuing Education and the Hutton House Lectures will now serve coffee in paper cups that are SFI-certified, which means that the product comes from a company that implements sustainable forestry methods.

Continuing Ed

Staff from the School of Continuing Education and Hutton House Lectures enjoying coffee in their new sustainable cups.

Click here for more information about the Green Office Program.

From The Desk of A Green Office – Continuing Education & The Hutton House Lectures

Officially launching in the spring of 2013, the LIU Post Green Office Program has grown to include 15 offices.

In this new series “From The Desk of A Green Office,” we will be highlighting some of the measures taken by these offices in order to become more sustainable.

This week, we will look at the School of Continuing Education and the Hutton House Lectures.

One of our most recent participants, this office has already made strides in becoming a more sustainable workplace. For example, they have already taken measures to reduce the amount of paper that is printed in their office.

Kay Sato, the Assistant Provost for Continuing Education and Hutton House Lectures, said:

“When we realized that reams of paper were disappearing at an alarming rate, we knew that something had to be done. We then thought of the Green Office Program, which encourages all participating offices to use e-documents whenever possible. And being that we have found that e-documents are becoming more and more accepted we have committed to using them as much as possible rather than printing. Using e-documents whenever possible is certainly the right thing to do for people who really care about the planet!”

In addition to their commitment to use less paper, they are also implementing more sustainable purchasing decisions. For example, instead of serving coffee in Styrofoam cups which are not recyclable, the School of Continuing Education and the Hutton House Lectures will now serve coffee in paper cups that are SFI-certified, which means that the product comes from a company that implements sustainable forestry methods.

Continuing Ed

Staff from the School of Continuing Education and Hutton House Lectures enjoying coffee in their new sustainable cups.

Click here for more information about the Green Office Program.

LIU Post Debuts Waste Snapshot

Long Island is known for many things – beautiful beaches, Fire Island, the Montauk lighthouse, and the glamor of the Hamptons. However, in 1987, Long Island became known for something that wasn’t as glamorous – its garbage.

Arguably one of the trashiest stories to ever hit the media, the journey of the Mobro 4000 and its 3,168 tons of garbage from Long Island to Belize and back to Long Island highlighted America’s growing waste problem and brought the topic to the forefront of national discussion. It also brought a lot of attention to the need for recycling and it is often credited for sparking the higher recycling rates seen in the late 1980s.

Mobro 4000

Originally slated to dispose its waste in North Carolina, the Mobro 4000 was denied and subsequently denied everywhere else as far south as Belize. Ultimately, it was forced to come back to Long Island where it was met with a temporary restraining order. Finally, after spending over 6 months at sea, the trash was incinerated in Brooklyn.

Even to this day, Long Islanders are some of the largest producers of waste. In fact, according to a 2008 report by the Citizens Campaign For The Environment, Long Islanders generate nearly 9 pounds per person per day of waste, which is nearly double the national average of 4.4 pounds.

Being that landfill space is very limited on Long Island, it has never been more important to recycle. In fact, because of the Long Island Landfill Law that was enacted in 1990, many landfills have been closed in order to further safeguard Long Island’s sole source aquifer, the primary source of drinking water for all Long Islanders. That means we must either recycle or haul our remaining trash to upstate or out-of-state landfills, some as far west as Ohio.

Unfortunately, we are still exporting a fairly large portion of this waste off Long Island. In fact, an article in the New York Times estimated that roughly 1.1 million tons or 30 percent of the total waste stream gets hauled off Long Island to out-of-state landfills and waste facilities, which is equivalent to about 50,000 tractor-trailer loads of garbage per year.

Being committed to waste reduction and recycling, LIU Post is always searching for ways to become more sustainable. In terms of waste, we have taken the time to analyze and measure each individual waste stream that gets disposed of on campus and we have compiled that information into a  waste snapshot that details the entire disposal process for each item.

Whether it ended up in a recycling bin or a trash can, users can expect to learn about how the product will be disposed and in some cases what that product will become in its second life.

We hope that this snapshot will educate our campus community about the many recycling initiatives that we have going on at our campus. And ultimately, we hope that it will inspire them to recycle as much as possible being that waste is something that all of us produce on a daily basis.

LIU Post Diverts 17% of Waste At Last Home Football Game

On Saturday, November 9th, 2013, LIU Post participated in the Game Day Recycling Challenge for the second year in a row.

With over 700 fans at the game, the LIU Post Recycling Program managed to recycle 17% of the total waste generated thereby reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by 190 pounds of CO2e.

The LIU Post Recycling Program would like to thank all of the fans that came to support the LIU Post Pioneer Football team and this endeavor in addition to the volunteers from the LIU Post Baseball team.

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LIU Post Baseball Players
Rich Maccarone, Joe Arena, Tom Tolan, Matt Bowers

What the Recycling Scholarship Has Done For Me

By: Amal B. Zeidan, Recipient of the LIU Post Recycling Scholarship

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Students always welcome weeks that are packed with assignments, exams and papers that have somehow supernaturally been assigned a due date within the same 5-day period. We appreciate the collaborative effort of highly limiting the social life of students, off-putting any sort of involvement outside the class room and restricting any participation of on-campus happenings. However, very rarely do we see an email or a flyer that stops us in our tracks and changes our outlined path for the day. That is what the Sustainable Creative Expressions Contest did for me.

I had much to do and very little time to waste, but I have always had a heart for the wholeness of the world, for the unity that can be maintained and for the knowledge we can pass on to others who have the same passions and desires. I knew that ceasing the current project I was working on would be worth going through the new window that was just opened for me.

The closing of school books and the opening of the mind was on the rise. So there it began the work of a creative expression. It emerged like the Titanic was being revived from the Atlantic Ocean. I had never written anything more thought provoking. To set a mirror in front of the world and boldly proclaim a problem was my vision. I had every intention of revealing how broken we truly are. Not just humanity, but the whole world is in dire need of saving. Throughout the centuries, we have been attempting to cover up our flaws with temporary bandages that always fall off when the storm comes. Our own ideas of how to fix the world have failed tremendously. We are exceeding in technology, science and design, yet we are lacking in integrity and morality. I wanted to write this piece to convey a message of helplessness. Since we have been created, we must realize that we do not hold the antidote for the human condition. It is not in and of ourselves.

Many people do not see the flaws in humanity or that there is even a need for a remedy, which is one of the reasons I chose to write a piece for the Sustainable Creative Expressions Contest. I wanted to bring this realization that “we are not okay.” Just take a look at our schools; they are being torn apart by words that have been used since the birth of this country. All of a sudden, it has become offensive to certain people. This is just one example of how bumpy our road has become. Our government has even lost its stability.

I did not expect to place in this contest; I just wanted this idea to be heard. I wanted people, especially students, to begin to understand the information they receive throughout their days. When the interpretation of information occurs correctly, it becomes knowledge. But to have knowledge is only the beginning. We must apply that knowledge and in turn, it becomes wisdom.

When I had received the email to notify me that I had won a prize for my piece, I was convinced that one voice can make a difference. One voice crying out through the hazy fog produced by so many contradicting ideas can bring people together to stand up for an un-altering truth. Receiving the scholarship not only encouraged me as a student, but encouraged the effort I had put into the awareness I was trying to raise. I thought to myself, “someone does understand.”

This not only led to encouragement, but a desire to do more and exceed. This Fall 2013 semester, I have taken on the role of President of Brothers and Sisters in Christ (BASIC) and Vice President of the new British Parliament Debate Team on campus. My passion is not to get students to think like me, but to get students to form their own conclusions. Being able to equip students to assess the current situation that the world around us is in and having the ability to arrive at a solution that will not fail is the mission I am on. Though the mission may be long, the truth is worth it.

In closing, being awarded this scholarship has given me hope to continue the pursuit of a worldwide resolution for the fallen nature of mankind. Receiving the money was a blessing and has helped with school costs. However, the impact of winning has very little to do with the actual money, rather what the money represents. I am grateful for placing in this contest. It has opened doors I did not know existed and has opened my mind more than I knew could happen.

At The End

By: Amal B. Zeidan, Recipient of the LIU Post Recycling Scholarship

Who says this is paradise?

Who says this is where we belong?

I can tell you right now, this is not our home.

Look outside,

The world is crying,

Even the clouds tear.

All this chaos can’t mean

The original plan for life is near.

Our schools take life out of our books and replace it with partiality.

Our TVs mock true life & our music perverts the sweet taste of light.

Our professors unknowingly suppress the intellect that frees us from deceit.

Our websites dilute our minds & our tasteless bumper stickers serve only as scratch covers.

But when destruction arrives, oh how they bellow.

“Where are you God, don’t you hear our cry?!”

Do my eyes deceive me or is it true?

Do we choose life or is it death we welcome through?

Are we so blindly distracted by our temporary desires,

That our heart’s longing becomes permanently stained?

Do we fill our cavern with immortality?

Do we put ourselves first before absolute truth?

Do we live to bring praise, honor and glory to ourselves?

To whom do we turn for comfort when all seems incomplete?

Another human that feels the same defeat?

Why do we think another human can save the partial nature into which naturally comes?

Can we really believe that broken plus broken equals whole, complete, or even one?

Humans are not beings that lost their other human half.

There is us.

And there is truth.

Calamity tears homes.

Disaster sources devastation.

Tragedy births agony.

Are we bound to our catastrophes?

Truth tears separation.

Truth sources joy.

Truth births healing.

In the end,

The truth stands.

All else falls.

Will you stand?

Or will you fall?

LIU Post Set To Compete And Recycle On Game Day

Game Day Challenge

This Saturday, November 9th, at 12:00pm, the LIU Post Pioneers will be playing their final home football game of the season against Assumption College.

In addition to contending on the gridiron, LIU Post will also be competing in the 2013 Game Day Recycling Challenge. Run by a partnership of the College and University Recycling Coalition (CURC), RecycleMania, and Keep America Beautiful (KAB), the Game Day Recycling Challenge is a friendly competition for colleges and universities to promote waste reduction at their football games.

So, along with implementing measures to reduce waste, members of the LIU Post Recycling Program will be on hand to encourage fans to recycle as much as possible. If you have any questions about this initiative or recycling, please be sure to find a member of our recycling team at the game and they’d be more than happy to assist you.

Also, all of the money raised from the 5-cent deposits on the bottles and cans recycled at the game will be put towards the LIU Post Recycling Scholarship.

Go Pioneers!